Home 2019-11-11T23:27:41+00:00

Wild Soul Calendar

Donate $55 or more and receive a calendar of Andrea’s beautiful African wildlife photography.

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Wild Soul Calendar

Donate $55 or more and receive a calendar of Andrea’s beautiful African wildlife photography.

View Calendar

Supporting African Wildlife Through:

Wildlife conservation hands-on volunteering in South Africa and Botswana

Wildlife conservation educational photo presentations

Fundraising:

conservation educational talks and

wildlife photography sales

Supporting African Wildlife Through

Wildlife conservation hands-on volunteering in South Africa and Botswana

Wildlife conservation educational photo presentations

Fundraising through:

wildlife conservation educational talks

Wildlife photography salesĀ  ~ proceeds donated to conservation needs

In 2013 I went on my first African safari and, as I anticipated, I fell in love with Africa and the animals. I felt a strong pull to be actively involved with hands-on, boots- on- the- ground wildlife conservation. I discovered Phinda Wildlife Reserve through ACE (African Conservation Experience) and my passionate journey began. This has been a life changing experience. I continue to return to Phinda in South Africa as well as Botswana through ACE to participate in wildlife monitoring and conservation efforts. Once back in the US, I use my experiences to offer educational presentations on the pro-active steps to Wildlife Conservation as well as the interventions to save and protect wildlife.

For the past 3 years I have participated in conservation efforts atĀ  Phinda , a 70,000+ acre Wildlife Reserve in South Africa. Wildlife Monitors spend the entire day in the bush with a focus on the priority species ; elephant; rhino; cheetah; lion and leopard. Monitors drive through the sections of the 70,000+ acre reserve daily. Data is recorded whenever a priority species is sighted. Phinda is a closed (fenced) reserve. Daily monitoring and documented statistics allow the managers of reserve to be record births, deaths, injuries, and use of habitat. Hands-on activities can range from putting radio collars on a animal for tracking, treating an injured animal, transferring an animal out of the reserve, de-horning rhino, and collecting DNA to name a few. Fenced-in habitats must be in balance in order to support the necessary territories and food sources for animal populations.

African wildlife in action

African wildlife in action